HELP! Question about Chases' House

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HELP! Question about Chases' House

Post by Guest » Jul 27th 2004, 1:36 pm

Does anyone know what kind of architecture the Chases house is? Or maybe what era that style was built in? I absolutely love their home and eventually when I buy my own house, would love for my house to resemble theirs. I do realize that episodes 2-19 were shot on a soundstage (not an actual house), but episode 1 was, and the rest of the episodes seemed to be inspired from that first house. Any help or suggestions as to where I can find this info. would be greatly appreciated!

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Natasha (candygirl)
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Post by Natasha (candygirl) » Jul 27th 2004, 3:10 pm

There is some information about the real house, as well as the soundstage. I am not an architecture student so I could be totally wrong about all of this, but the house looks to be a California Craftsman style. If you have ever seen Buffy the Vampire Slayer, her mom's house is another example of California Craftsman style. Some info about the particular style:
(1900-1930)
Because of the bungalow's strong early links to the state, the terms "California Bungalow" or "California Craftsman" were sometimes applied to many houses that might otherwise be called Craftsman. The name comes from designs presented in the artistic and popular Craftsman magazine, published by Gustav Stickley from 1901-1916. Gradually, however, the word took on its own momentum, going beyond any specific connections to Stickley or his work, and it came to be freely used by others as being characteristic of the period and associated with classic bungalows wherever they may be throughout the country.

Features include:

* street-facing gables with composition or shingled roofs
* painted or stained brown or dark green (to merge with nature)
* wide overhanging eaves
* the sleeping porch
* front door opens directly into the living room
* dark wood paneling
* plastered ceiling (sometimes crossed geometrically with wooden beams)
* always a fireplace
* casement windows
* arched opening flanked with bookcases separates living room/dining room
* bedrooms with woodwork painted a light color
* kitchen built-ins
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