Soda or pop?

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K-man
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Post by K-man » Dec 13th 2002, 6:55 pm

I used to play hockey with guys who called their jersey a sweater. I think that came from way-back-when in Canada when hockey was created. I guess they played on frozen rivers and since Canada is like the coldest place in the world they probably wore sweaters to keep warm. Just a theory.
I agree Candygirl, I'm not gonna single anyone out but why add an 'S' to the end of a word other than to make it plural? And what is that when people ad an 'ed' to the end of a word? (I'm not trying to wound like Seinfeld, really.) I hear people say things like, "The grass growed through the cracks in the driveway.". "I ate too much and now my stomach is blowed up." My friends and I used to play games in our conversations. Sometimes we would see how many times we could use incorrect english/grammar in a sentence. Sometimes we had to use some form of the f-word in anything we said. Ahh.....the good old days.
Daddy sold the farm and they've killed my trees. K-man

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fnordboy
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Post by fnordboy » Dec 13th 2002, 6:59 pm

K-man wrote: Sometimes we had to use some form of the f-word in anything we said. Ahh.....the good old days.
Must have been hard using "filial" in every sentence ;)

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Natasha (candygirl)
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Post by Natasha (candygirl) » Dec 13th 2002, 7:03 pm

And let's be honest - 99% of the time, "piety" follows "filial" so you guys must have exhausted the topic!

My favorite example: children should get into their parents' bed to warm it up and to let the bedbugs sate themselves.

:D
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Post by Nostradamus » Dec 16th 2002, 10:26 am

It's bin a long tom since I was in da fine siddy of Noo Awlins, but I still got dis book about how dey talk dere. :wink:

Excerpts from "New Orleans Talkin' A Guide to Yat, Creole And Some Cajun" by Justin G.T. Lemotte III.
  • Ant Knee: Common male name in Noo Awlins.
    Bat Room: Where you find a bat tub, a zinc, and a terlet.
    Cat Lick: The dominant religion in Noo Awlins and the rest of south Looziana.
    Chawmer: To call a young Noo Awlins miss a "chawmer" is no compliment. A chawmer is the kind of girl who shows up at the senior prom chewing gum and wearing purple eye shadow.
    Doll In: What one chawmer calls another.
    Dose: Plural pronoun. Goes with dese, dem, dis, and dat.
    Gaud: A watchman.
    Hen: The ability to hear. "Ant Knee was hod a hen."
    Hod: Difficult.
    Ignut: Unaware, unlearned, uneducated. Chawmer 1: "I taught you was gonna da prom wit Randy." Chawmer 2: "RANDY? YA KIDDEN? DAT IGNUT YAT!"
    Mar, To: The day after today.
    Perm: A composition in verse.
    Rum: Part of a house.
    Taught: Past tense of tank. "I taught, derefore I was."
    Tom: What a watch or clock measures.
    Yat: A Yat is the Cockney of Noo Awlins. The name comes from the traditional Yat greeting, "Wha yat, man?" The proper response is not "Right here!" or "On the spot?" but some version of "Okay," such as "Aw Rite!"
8)
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TomSpeed
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Re: Soda or pop?

Post by TomSpeed » Feb 14th 2003, 11:50 pm

candygirl wrote:Quiz time!
Jason Rosenfeld wrote:Do you call what you wear to work out: gym shoes or sneakers?

When I tell some people I got a new pair of sneakers, they are like "what the hell are sneakers?" I think that their are lots of words like that.

Catsup, Ketchup (though homonyms, hehe)
Wanker, Rojek
Pie, Pizza
Versateller, Mac Machine, ATM

When I first moved out of NY (I am back in NY again, though), I called a pizzeria and ordered a "pie" and they didn't know what I was talking about.
Just for the sake of allowing people to mock on a regional basis, confess!

I was born in Chicago but now live in California so I have a combo pack:
pop, sneakers, ketchup, Rojerk, pizza, ATM

When I moved to California, I noticed that a lot of people pronounce the short i sound almost like a short e sound, so pillow sounds more like pellow. One of my teachers (a California native) pronounced bag as baig.

I want to hear everyone else's answers to Jason's "you talk funny" quiz. Feel free to add other examples - like "punch buggy" as opposed to "slug bug."

:D
Down South, it's soda or Coke, sneakers, and ATM. If you say soda, you will get Coke. You have to ask for Pepsi. One of the worst marketing decisions in history was to change the formula for Coke. My family and many others in my neighborhood stocked up on the good stuff. We were so glad the company came to its senses and brought the original formula back. DrPepper is also big here, too. And, nothing beats a rum and Coke after a hard day at work.
TomSpeed

Patty: If Rayanne's not seeing you, and we're not seeing you, who is seeing you?
Graham: And how much of you?
Angela: Dad!
Graham: Oh, I'm sorry! I asked a question about your life, didn't I? Woah, what came over me?
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sid_barrett
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Re: ATM Fix Everything!

Post by sid_barrett » Feb 24th 2003, 2:28 am

Nostradamus wrote:Some others, at random:
  • Kal-kya-later
    Ruhf
    Mom
    Uh-loom-uh-num
    Catch-up
    Athletic shoes or cross trainers for flat surfaces; shoes are dressy; hikers are all-purpose; boots are heavy-duty for work or bad weather.
    Peetza
    A-Tee-eM
    Erb
    Cussing or words that'd make a sailor blush
    Dumpster, though I use that term to describe something else as well :wink:
    El-a-vater
    Marker, except for fancy art supplies, which are "felt tip pens"
    Scotch tape
    Duck tape
    Windex
    Band-Aid
    Crayons
    Q-Tips
    Zeer-ox
    Rubbers protect against something, but it's got nothing to do with cloud cover!
    Kleen-x
that pretty sums up where i live.
pop = soda
book bag
i have no idea what Rojek means tho.
"...and I said ' oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, what a feeling'"

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Post by crimsonglowgurl » Apr 5th 2003, 3:28 am

some pronounce the word coupons like " cue-pons" others like "coo-pons"

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Post by pistolpeg » May 30th 2003, 2:24 pm

Is a bubbler a water cooler?
Sometimes someone says something really small, and it just fits right into this empty place in your heart.

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Nothingman
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Post by Nothingman » May 30th 2003, 5:37 pm

Okay, here we go… I’m just a country boy from Montana, so I’m not fumilya with all yous big city talk.

Soda is always called Pop, unless you are ordering a Whiskey coke, in which case you only mix with coke. Pepsi is for kids, and diet anything should never be used as a mixer.

Shirley Temple = 7 UP and grenadine
Roy Rogers = Coke and Grenadine, I’ve been some places around the country that have this reversed. Shirley Temples are pink therefore they are associated with a girl, case closed.

Other drink differences: Colorado Bulldog = white Russian with coke, and a Camel Hump is called by it’s real name a “Cowboy Cock Sucker”, and if your drink tastes like fruit, pass it on down to the old lady and get yourself a beer.

Tennis shoes: any shoe you exercise in
Shoes: what you wear everyday
Boots: designated by hiking or working
Root: rymes with foot not boot
Hoody: a hooded sweatshirt
Truck: Anything with 4 wheel drive and a low range gearbox
Car: Everything else
By the way, only women drive Escalades and Chevy Avalanches around here, Suburbans are iffy. They are usually doctors’ wives taking their kids to soccer practice and trucks without 4 wheel drive make no sense to us, they are about as useful as ti** on a bull.
Cussing: only your mom asks you not to curse
ATM or Cash Machine
Davenport: What my Grandmother always called the couch?


I have a hearing problem so I often get and “How’s it going?” “What’s going on?” mixed up, so often it’s going “nut’n or not much” and “pretty good or not bad” is what’s going on. I usually guess; I figure I have a 50/50 chance. It often throws people for a loop when I get it wrong. By the way if someone asks you a question in a greeting like this you are expected to answer before coming back with another question.

“yous guys”: a group of people you know “Hey, what yous guys doin?” I don't use this, but I know people who do.

I’m a hockey player and have been to alot (a lot is really one word) of camps in Western Canada so here are some differences:

I say Jerseys, they say sweaters (by the way they really used to be sweaters before jersey material was invented, they were made of wool or cotton, with a shoelace to tighten the collar)

I say center, they say centre

I say Breezers (the padded shorts), they say short pants

I say Inline Hockey Pants, they call them Cooperalls

Lid: your helmet
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starbug
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Post by starbug » Jun 2nd 2003, 5:18 am

Hehe :)
I drove through Montana a couple of years ago and (apart from it being the most beautiful state I've visited) I noticed the 'Root' one. Weird.

On the way we went through Spokane (being from the UK we would pronounce that 'Spoh-kayne') and couldn't figure out why every time we heard it mentioned by others it was 'Spoooo-keeeen'. :D

Mr. S (from Northern Ireland) was foxed by supermarket etiquette in the USA. Being from the UK we (and I'm not proud of this) have a tendency to not talk to people who are behind cash registers unless absolutely necessary.
First walmart we go into, I'm busy unpacking the stuff onto the belt so Mr. S has to deal with the pleasantries. it goes like this:
Assistant: 'Hi, how are you today?'
Mr. S: 'errr, OK.' [bemused expression]
*big pause*
Assistant: 'Hi, how are you today?' [slightly louder]
Mr. S: 'I'm fine, thanks'.

So he and the cashier are now looking at each other weirdly, and I have to butt in with 'Fine thanks. How are you?'.

After we left I explained that it's the done thing in the US (in my experience) that the assistant asks you how you are and you ALWAYS have to reply (despite how you might actually be feeling) 'Fine thanks. How are you?' to which they reply 'Fine thanks' possibly with the addition of some other pleasantry and then you get on with your lives.
He was like 'Okaaaaaay....' but then got into it.

I can tell you, going back to the UK after a month in the US, everyone feels SO rude.
:D

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lance
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Post by lance » Jun 2nd 2003, 9:18 am

starbug wrote:Hehe :)
I drove through Montana a couple of years ago and (apart from it being the most beautiful state I've visited) I noticed the 'Root' one. Weird.

On the way we went through Spokane (being from the UK we would pronounce that 'Spoh-kayne') and couldn't figure out why every time we heard it mentioned by others it was 'Spoooo-keeeen'. :D

Mr. S (from Northern Ireland) was foxed by supermarket etiquette in the USA. Being from the UK we (and I'm not proud of this) have a tendency to not talk to people who are behind cash registers unless absolutely necessary.
First walmart we go into, I'm busy unpacking the stuff onto the belt so Mr. S has to deal with the pleasantries. it goes like this:
Assistant: 'Hi, how are you today?'
Mr. S: 'errr, OK.' [bemused expression]
*big pause*
Assistant: 'Hi, how are you today?' [slightly louder]
Mr. S: 'I'm fine, thanks'.

So he and the cashier are now looking at each other weirdly, and I have to butt in with 'Fine thanks. How are you?'.

After we left I explained that it's the done thing in the US (in my experience) that the assistant asks you how you are and you ALWAYS have to reply (despite how you might actually be feeling) 'Fine thanks. How are you?' to which they reply 'Fine thanks' possibly with the addition of some other pleasantry and then you get on with your lives.
He was like 'Okaaaaaay....' but then got into it.

I can tell you, going back to the UK after a month in the US, everyone feels SO rude.
:D
LOL!

Yup,

We do have that custom here. I remember in High School. People always asked each other, "How are you doing?" This was simply meant as a greeting. They didn't honestly want to know how you were doing. If you paused to tell them how you were doing, they were already past you and down the hall.

Weird, but true.

Best,

Lance Man

P.S. Starbug, I hope you have a better day and your boss lays off you for a while.

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Nothingman
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Post by Nothingman » Jun 2nd 2003, 10:41 am

I've noticed that depending on your location the "How's it going?" greeting may or may require a response. Here we answer about 90% of the time, but other places don't expect you to anwer at all.

Another thing I thought of is that since we are such a rural state, distances are measure in the time it takes you to get there, not in miles. For instance, Spokane (Spo-can), is about 5 hours from here. I have absolutely no idea how many miles it is. Only thing that is important is how much of my day it is going to take to get there.
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fnordboy
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Post by fnordboy » Jun 2nd 2003, 11:51 am

"How's it going?" here, or more like 'howzitgoin?", gets only another "howzitgoin?" or a "what's up"/"whats going on?". It doesn't get the real response you would think (ie it is going well).

Nothing here is measured in miles really either and I am in a very urban area. It is all in minutes.

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Natasha (candygirl)
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Post by Natasha (candygirl) » Jun 2nd 2003, 1:43 pm

fnordboy wrote:Nothing here is measured in miles really either and I am in a very urban area. It is all in minutes.
Totally! Even when I lived in LA, if you ask how far away something is, they will tell you, "It should take about 40 minutes, but if there's traffic it will take about an hour and a half. If you go at rush hour it will take more than two hours." Very precise!

Another acceptable response to "how's it going?" is just "hey" (but with proper inflection). Seriously.

:D
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Post by fnordboy » Jun 2nd 2003, 1:46 pm

candygirl wrote: Another acceptable response to "how's it going?" is just "hey" (but with proper inflection). Seriously.

:D
Totally. Or the ever popular head twitch. Not really a nod, more like a nod in reverse, just a little "bop" of the head as acknowledgement. I probably do this the most.

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