Just a few books/authors to suggest...

Discuss your favorite books, stories and other literary matters here. Recommend reading material to other forum users. What's on your bookshelf?
User avatar
Jody Barsch*
Lifehead
Posts: 1166
Joined: Jun 30th 2003, 1:30 pm
Location: Los Angeles

Post by Jody Barsch* » Jul 1st 2004, 1:18 am

Yes, it is the paper back edition. I used to really dig hardback books, maybe because when you're little most books are paper. (I still remember being so excited with my copy of Matilda because it was the first book I owned that had that raised type for the title.) Now I find that I am much fonder of paperback books, they're just so much sexier; they can be manipulated -- they record the reading experience so much better than hard backs. (For instance, my copy of Gone With the Wind is just thrashed from being chucked across the room so many times from that delicious frustration with Scarlett). Also, I just can't cope with book jackets. Any way, that's a jip that the CD only came with half the songs.

BTW, some hefty life issues arose this week, might need an extension on that Martin book report.
Kickstart The Riches movie!

User avatar
starbug
Lifehead
Posts: 1082
Joined: Jun 25th 2002, 4:51 am
Location: UK

Post by starbug » Jul 1st 2004, 7:02 am

The only Hornby I've actually read was How To Be Good, and frankly, it didn't do it for me. If that was his poorest novel, maybe I'll give one of the others a try... From the enthusiasm around High Fidelity, I think that's the one! I've seen the film and I enjoyed it so I bet the book is good. The film of About a Boy was good too.

---------------------------------------------
http://www.urban-hills.blogspot.com
---------------------------------------------

User avatar
Nothingman
Liberty High Graduate
Posts: 704
Joined: Feb 26th 2003, 3:39 pm
Location: Hockey Falls, USA
Contact:

Post by Nothingman » Jul 9th 2004, 10:55 am

Well I just finished The Perks of Being a Wallflower. After Jody’s recommendation, I put it on my Christmas list and finally got around to reading it. I was very impressed, thank you for referring this book. I was different from the books I normally read because it focuses on the characters and their feelings rather than the events that were going on, made for a very personal read. While I was reading I kept drawing all these comparisons between Charlie and William, from Almost Famous. They are very similar characters. I’m going to loan the book to a friend and then read it again.
"To come to your senses, you must first go out of your mind." - Alan Watts

User avatar
Jody Barsch*
Lifehead
Posts: 1166
Joined: Jun 30th 2003, 1:30 pm
Location: Los Angeles

Post by Jody Barsch* » Jul 9th 2004, 5:01 pm

Nothingman wrote:While I was reading I kept drawing all these comparisons between Charlie and William, from Almost Famous. They are very similar characters.
Totally!!!!


I'm actually trying to get Perks added to my sophomore curriculum which I am building around the ideas of making choices and coping, and will probably tie it in to my unit on Catcher in the Rye and Harold and Maude

Anyway, I'm glad you liked it! By the way, I love Norman Mclean's writing (I fell in love with Montana authors in high school), I've always been meaning to tell you that, although it probably doesn't make much of a difference to you... :-P

Ok ... cheers!
Kickstart The Riches movie!

User avatar
Natasha (candygirl)
MSCL.com Team
MSCL.com Team
Posts: 5374
Joined: Dec 7th 2001, 3:05 am
Location: California

Post by Natasha (candygirl) » Jul 11th 2004, 3:50 am

Jody Barsch* wrote:I used to really dig hardback books, maybe because when you're little most books are paper. (I still remember being so excited with my copy of Matilda because it was the first book I owned that had that raised type for the title.) Now I find that I am much fonder of paperback books. Also, I just can't cope with book jackets.
I know exactly what you mean - I went through this phase where I LOVED hardback books, so I insisted on buying the hardback 25th anniversary edition of the Princess Bride, and I bought all of the Harry Potter books in hardback but...they are harder to read in bed or with one hand or lying down or pretty much any which way. I guess I will have to become a book collector so that I can have the books I read and then the books that are nice. :wink:
Any way, that's a jip that the CD only came with half the songs.
I am pretty sure it was the cost of getting clearance for all the songs that caused this, but I'm okay with it. I was actually impressed that there was a CD at all because when I was younger, I wanted to write a novel that included a tape (this was before CDs) of pertinent songs, voices, noises, etc. Kind of like the little kid books where you press a button and Ernie sings "Rubber Duckie" but for people over the age of 6.
BTW, some hefty life issues arose this week, might need an extension on that Martin book report.
Okay, I guess I'll let it slide this time :wink: I was feeling rather proud of myself because I managed to read five books in the last week (it helped that I had two plane rides and hours to kill at the airport).
starbug wrote:The only Hornby I've actually read was How To Be Good, and frankly, it didn't do it for me. If that was his poorest novel, maybe I'll give one of the others a try.
Of his novels, I would say it is last on my list. I enjoyed High Fidelity and About a Boy much more. Both were funnier and more insightful than How to Be Good. I'd say give High Fidelity a try as it's one of my favorite books.
Natasha aka candygirl :: MSCL.com

Look, if this is weird for you, being tutored? I don't mind helping you a little longer.
You could have sex with me if you really want to help...I guess that's a "no"?

User avatar
Jody Barsch*
Lifehead
Posts: 1166
Joined: Jun 30th 2003, 1:30 pm
Location: Los Angeles

Post by Jody Barsch* » Aug 10th 2004, 12:18 am

Okay, so this isn't actually a book, well it is, but I bought the audio recording of it on CD. It's The World According to Mr. Rogers. I am a huge fan of Fred Rogers! I was listening to it in my car today, and as his wife read the introduction she wrote about him, his work, and their marriage, I was totally crying. He really was the most amazing person.
Kickstart The Riches movie!

User avatar
Natasha (candygirl)
MSCL.com Team
MSCL.com Team
Posts: 5374
Joined: Dec 7th 2001, 3:05 am
Location: California

Post by Natasha (candygirl) » Aug 10th 2004, 2:09 am

I have the mini-book "You Are Special: Neighborly Wisdom from Mister Rogers" - it's awesome. I keep meaning to collect the acquire the rest of his books. I have always loved Mr. Rogers, and when I started reading all the things his friends and family had to say when he passed away, I was literally in tears for days. I really wanted to go to the memorial service, but I couldn't swing the flight on such short notice. I taped it but still haven't been able to watch it. Anyway, there were some good comments about him in this thread.
Natasha aka candygirl :: MSCL.com

Look, if this is weird for you, being tutored? I don't mind helping you a little longer.
You could have sex with me if you really want to help...I guess that's a "no"?

User avatar
Natasha (candygirl)
MSCL.com Team
MSCL.com Team
Posts: 5374
Joined: Dec 7th 2001, 3:05 am
Location: California

Post by Natasha (candygirl) » Aug 18th 2004, 5:00 am

Jody, I meant to post about this earlier, but I read Holidays on Ice last week. I had already read Dinah the Christmas Whore in Naked, but since I still haven't read Barrel Fever all of the other stories were new to me. Santaland Diaries was my favorite - classic Sedaris.

:lol:
Natasha aka candygirl :: MSCL.com

Look, if this is weird for you, being tutored? I don't mind helping you a little longer.
You could have sex with me if you really want to help...I guess that's a "no"?

User avatar
Nothingman
Liberty High Graduate
Posts: 704
Joined: Feb 26th 2003, 3:39 pm
Location: Hockey Falls, USA
Contact:

Post by Nothingman » Aug 18th 2004, 10:54 am

I'm currently working on High Fidelity, it's one of my favorite movies so on candygirl's recomendation I am reading the book. I'm impressed on how close the two are. The book just adds a little more depth to the story, but the movie really is dead on. I like constructing the new scenes in the book with the characters from the film in my head.
"To come to your senses, you must first go out of your mind." - Alan Watts

User avatar
Jody Barsch*
Lifehead
Posts: 1166
Joined: Jun 30th 2003, 1:30 pm
Location: Los Angeles

Post by Jody Barsch* » Aug 18th 2004, 11:42 am

I love the Dinah story! I pretty much love all the stories with Sharon in them. I don't remember if you said if you've read Denim and Corrduroy yet ... "6 to 8 Black Men" is the best!!! also "Ship Shape" "A Can of Worms" "Possession" "Nuit of the Living Dead" and the one about carrying the cup of coffee with the kid. Ok, basically I love it all, every time I go to list a favorite, six more come to mind ...

Oh! High Fidelity is the best!
Kickstart The Riches movie!

User avatar
emmie
Liberty High Graduate
Posts: 606
Joined: May 27th 1999, 10:34 pm
Location: NYC
Contact:

Post by emmie » Aug 19th 2004, 1:39 am

candygirl wrote:
Jody Barsch* wrote:I used to really dig hardback books, maybe because when you're little most books are paper. (I still remember being so excited with my copy of Matilda because it was the first book I owned that had that raised type for the title.) Now I find that I am much fonder of paperback books. Also, I just can't cope with book jackets.
I know exactly what you mean - I went through this phase where I LOVED hardback books, so I insisted on buying the hardback 25th anniversary edition of the Princess Bride, and I bought all of the Harry Potter books in hardback but...they are harder to read in bed or with one hand or lying down or pretty much any which way. I guess I will have to become a book collector so that I can have the books I read and then the books that are nice. :wink:
I completely agree! I love paperbacks because they are so easy to read and that they become personal. I do most of my reading outside of my home. I literally always have a book on me. because you never know when you'll be stuck with an odd pocket of time and need something to do. and hardbacks just aren't good for that. unfortunately, I find it hard to wait to buy some of my favorites on paperback. (is it sad that I now have 3 editions of the Princess Bride?)

also, I have to comment on The Perks of Being a Wallflower. I read it years ago when they first started publishing the MTV series of books. I've been waiting for the author to write something else. but as far as I know, he's only edited a collection of stories, right? sometimes you read a book at the perfect time in your life. and that's how it was with Perks. very few books have moved me like that one. and I love the Almost Famous connection that was made.

I think I need to reread High Fidelity. I read it 2 years ago and didn't like it. maybe it was because it was too true to life and I got pissed at the main character. I just couldn't relate to him. I also need to reread On the Road. I read that when I was 19 and hadn't travelled anywhere. I thought it was the most boring book I'd ever read. I think it's been enough time that I can give it another chance and gain something from it. funny how that works out, huh?

User avatar
Natasha (candygirl)
MSCL.com Team
MSCL.com Team
Posts: 5374
Joined: Dec 7th 2001, 3:05 am
Location: California

Post by Natasha (candygirl) » Aug 19th 2004, 3:41 am

Emmie, I am the same way. I have two books that I keep in the trunk of my car. Whenever I am stuck somewhere, I pull one out and read. One is Bridget Jones's Diary in paperback (because I somehow ended up with two copies of this book) and a hardcover version of This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald (again, inexplicably have two copies).

I did end up donating my paperback Harry Potter books to a local children's hospital though.

I know what you mean about reading books at a certain time in your life. I was fortunate that I originally read High Fidelity at a point where I was able to see Rob's point of view and found it mostly amusing. There were definitely some points where I thought he was being pig-headed and wrong, but for the most part I found it insightful and interesting to get the male perspective.
Natasha aka candygirl :: MSCL.com

Look, if this is weird for you, being tutored? I don't mind helping you a little longer.
You could have sex with me if you really want to help...I guess that's a "no"?

User avatar
Natasha (candygirl)
MSCL.com Team
MSCL.com Team
Posts: 5374
Joined: Dec 7th 2001, 3:05 am
Location: California

Post by Natasha (candygirl) » Aug 29th 2004, 2:00 am

starbug wrote:I've read Dave Eggers' book 'A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius' and I thoroughly enjoyed it... it's about his mother dying and him looking after his younger brother while they both grow up; and a set of trials and tribulations that occur. In amongst all this he begins to work/volunteer for a small magazine, and so it kind of winds around that too. It's a good book, well-written. I usually find it interesting to read books written in the male first person though...
I finally got around to reading this book a few weeks ago, and I enjoyed it. Very funny, a quick read. I am looking forward to his next book (which is being released in a few weeks) - it is a collection of short stories, which should be interesting given his writing style. I will have to make my way to the bookstore so that I can get a copy of You Shall Know Our Velocity before then. For some reason (OCD), I like reading things sequentially, even if the author did not intend for them to be a series. It's interesting to see an author's growth from book to book.
Natasha aka candygirl :: MSCL.com

Look, if this is weird for you, being tutored? I don't mind helping you a little longer.
You could have sex with me if you really want to help...I guess that's a "no"?

User avatar
emmie
Liberty High Graduate
Posts: 606
Joined: May 27th 1999, 10:34 pm
Location: NYC
Contact:

classics

Post by emmie » Sep 10th 2004, 5:14 pm

hmm...I'm in the mood for a classic. I've been reading so many contemporary fiction novels recently, that I'm just craving to read something written before I was born. any suggestions?

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest